Monday, May 14, 2012

DIY Inspiration: The Pollock impulse

It seems kind of weird (and inspiring at the same time) to let the chance decide the final result of an artwork. During the last century, many artists became mere containers of impulses and emotions into the hands of random. Despite his many detractors, Jackson Pollock brought his influence beyond his canvas to many other artistic fields.

Fashion has always been fueled by fine art, but probably it wasn't until Alexander McQueen started making his irreverent fashion shows when they started merging in a more plastic way. Somehow, McQueen was a pioneer in leaving aside the commercial part of fashion in order to turn the runway into an ephimeral art show that sought to provoke extreme reactions into his viewers.

Alexander McQueen closed his runway SS 1999 with an amazing show in which two robots from a car assembly line painted a huge white dress on the model Shalom Harlow.

A lot of designers have worked with this "Pollock impulse" that makes every garment become a unique piece, thanks to the random falling of paint. A few seasons ago Yves Saint Laurent (Cruise 2008), Dolce & Gabbana (SS RTW 2008), Proenza Shouler (2010), Tory Burch (2010) and many others built their clothes with paint splatters.

Recently, the brand Never Denim brought this artistic impulse back to the fashion spotlight. I personally love their splattered collection.
Background: Jackson Pollock, Number 1 (1950)
Never Denim SS 2012, via
Background: Jackson Pollock, White Light (1954)
Proenza Schouler RTW Fall 2010 / Tory Burch RTW Fall 2010 / Dolce & Gabbana RTW SS 2008

This is the inspiration for the next DIY. If you follow me on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram you might have seen a little sneak peek. Would you dare to splatter your clothes with paint? Which one of these interpretations do you like better?


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